Around the world on the Australis

Australis and QE 2 in Cherbourg

Australis and QE 2 in Cherbourg

 

There were many, modern ships on the seas but none did it better. It wasn’t always the quality of the cabin or the carpet that counted. I saw friends off on various ships including Oriana, Canberra and visited such famous ships as the France and QEII. None had the magic of the AMERICA/AUSTRALIS .When I saw AUSTRALIS berthed next to the other sleek ships in port I was never embarrassed to be going back on board. She may not have been as attractive, but to me the attraction was her interior, her history as the SS AMERICA, and the knowledge that she was a friendly, safe, and an extremely comfortable ship.Steve Mullis

AROUND THE WORLD ON THE AUSTRALIS.

Excerpts from S.S. America – U.S.S. West Point – S.S. Australis, the many lives of a great ship. Lawrence Driscoll

AROUD THE WORLD ON THE AUSTRALIS.

SOUTHAMPTON TO DOWN UNDER.

Chandris understood the importance of first impressions. In Southampton they rolled out the red carpet and greeted new passengers with a Captain’s ‘Welcome aboard party’. Those expecting a ‘no-frills’ austere immigrant ship were pleasantly surprised by comfortable facilities and a warm friendly atmosphere.

The Greek crew set the tone. More Fun loving and engaging than their North American counterparts on the America they provided a Greek ‘Dolce Vita’ atmosphere. Former passenger Steve Mullis described the atmosphere on board as. “Always great, never a dull moment and the Greek crew were very friendly, especially if you tried to learn a bit of their language and do the Zorba dance.”

AUSTRALIS’s first captains, Demitrios Challioris knew how to spread the charm.  “Being the Captain of such an enormous cruise liner was a very demanding job. Every morning you would have to go out onto the deck, greet the passengers, kiss their foreheads, and listen to their wishes and complaints. Very often I was with my wife, strolling together on the deck, so I could easily approach a pretty woman and talk to her, pay her a compliment and she would say, “ Captain would you invite me to your table tonight? “ Madam, consider yourself invited”.

Captain Challioris was in command of a crew of 586.  Ken Ironside was a gym instructor from 1973 to 1974, and one of the seventy English-speaking members of the crew. He describes the atmosphere on the ship as Greek, but with an international touch. The ship’s officers were Greek however the balance of the crew was a mixture of Indian, Lebanese and African. Ken described the crew as…“Very close to each other, going ashore in groups and also into staterooms in the evening. When there was a party onboard (which was just about every night) we would invite the Greek officers along to join us. I certainly loved working on her.” The ship’s crew made the traveling experience pleasant by maintaining good organization, high standards of cleanliness, and friendly service.”

Australis 1.4848Early on the Australis developed a reputation as a party boat making the TV series “Love Boat” look like a religious retreat.  Crew member Margaret Volovinis described a surreal atmosphere where “Life as we know it had been temporarily suspended. That feeling of “life suspended” was striking on all the ships I worked on during migrant voyages. These passengers had left behind everything familiar, including their extended families. They were going to the other side of the world to face so many unknowns. There was a definite feeling that the ship was no-man’s land and whatever they did on board would not be counted…. in the old, or the new, life. This led to parents leaving their children in the playroom for hours or to wander the ship at will, young (and not-so-young!) men and women falling into passionate romances with other passengers or (only too willing!) crew members and a general air of true gay abandon! I never met passengers that had such an effect on me. People enjoying their annual two week holiday in the sun weren’t in the same category.”

Australis 1.581In the Playroom Volvinis was one of two working to maintain a certain measure of control. “  I remember my initial fear and amazement that as we were apparently supposed to entertain and care for 400 children (many without English) for 12 hours a day in a playroom that today would be considered inadequate for 40! Having learned to live with clearly impossible job requirements, I went on to acquire the addiction to ships and the sea which has remained with me to this day.”

Darren Byrne and friend Brian were among the children wondering the ship at will exploring every nook and cranny like “Naughty boys should,” venturing into off limits ‘Crew only’ spaces, such as the engine room. Their exploration took them down to the lower decks where one of their favorite activities was using portholes for a toilet, that is until a wave hit the side of the ship and gallons of water started pouring in. “We ran, leaving the porthole open. We were scared in case the ship sank because the porthole was open. As kids we felt every crewmember was looking for us and we were in for it if we were caught.”

Sailing through the Mediterranean the ship picked up more passengers; sailed through the Suez Canal then the long passage to Australia.

 

NORTHBOUND TO SOUTHAMPTON

Australis 1.589The return voyage from Australia and New Zealand to Southampton would take on a very different mix of passengers. Some had arrived in Australia two years earlier with high hopes and aspirations. They were now going back home. Starting a new life from scratch was not for everyone. They were homesick, missing the old country, their friends and looking forward to the familiar change of seasons. Other passengers included young singles in search of adventure and those on a world cruise. As with the southbound passage the price was right. Discontented settlers who met the two year minimum residency had the passage paid for by the government. For all others the cost was far less than flying with a much bigger baggage allowance (40 cubic feet).

Many of the passengers were young and had immigrated with their parents. Now in their late teens and early twenties they set out to explore the world.

Steve Mullis was 21 when he once again boarded the ship in May of 1973. He was …“greeted by a steward, and, with my guitar and cabin luggage, was taken to my cabin on C Deck. As it happened I was going to be in the cabin next to the one I was in as a boy in 1966. The memories came flooding back and the sight of the blue blankets and the Chandris towels was all a bit much. Not wanting to waste time in my cabin I headed for the Promenade Deck and getting to know her through adult eyes. It was a magical experience, I was on my own, I didn’t know anybody, I was going somewhere I knew little about and for once in my life I didn’t care. I was happy at last, free from everything”.

It did not take long to get settled in, and meeting the four or five others sharing the assigned cabin. Then off, as they had once done as young boys, to explore the ship noting changes and the location of the bars and food. They were never far away from cold frosty ale. The bars on the ship would open at 10AM and featured fine Australian beer for only 16c a can, Australis 1.584the double scotches were 65c each, making it possible to enjoy a few. Dinner was served in two sittings in either the Pacific or Atlantic restaurants,  and with ten passengers to a table it was not difficult to make new friends. Service was excellent, the Ouzo plentiful, and the food was good but repetitive. There were new menu items to try out such as ox tail, the spinach and feta pie that was a Greek favorite, and some dishes that needed a little help. “Without HP sauce the meat would have been terrible”. For variety there were special dinners and buffets on the enclosed Promenade.

Australis 1.1399

from the Steve Mullis Collection

Ships at sea have a way of coalescing disparate individuals into one familiar maritime community. Over the next five and a half weeks they would form friendships, explore, entertain, be entertained, relax, love, sleep, eat, drink and play. Nature and time would cure any over indulgences; fresh sea air and a few hours in a deck chair would help revitalize the partygoers. Gazing at the ever-changing seas, the sun, moon, and stars would bring peace to the soul.

THE GOLDEN OLDIE

The AUSTRALIS continued to be popular and profitable into the mid 70’s. By then she was 35, which for a ship, is a rather advanced age. It’s unusual for a passenger ship to work beyond 30 years and many of her contemporaries were gone. The Mauretania, Nieuw Amsterdam and Queen Elizabeth had all been withdrawn from service in the late 1960’s. Passengers boarding the ship noticed signs of age. “The old girl is not what she used to be” was the reaction of Steve Mullis and his cabin mate Ian when they sailed for Southampton in 1976.

On November 18, 1977, the AUSTRALIS made her last sailing out of Southampton with 650 immigrants. After discharging her last passengers in Sidney she sailed to the remote port of Timaru New Zealand where she would once again be for sale.

 WHAT DO YOU REMEMBER ?

 

 

 

 

32 thoughts on “Around the world on the Australis

  1. Victoria Fletcher

    My Father was a pursur on this ship. Anyone remember him? Michael Fletcher. If you have any memory of him.

  2. Fee jobson

    Hi , I’m adopted I’m 45 I live in Melbourne Australia , apparently my biological birth mother when she came over on the Australis in the early 1970 or so from Southhampton had a bit of a shipboard romance with a crew member ( but DOSENT remember his name ? ) she was about 26 and Irish and her name was emmerenchia ( Emmer ) HE WAS GREEK , AND IM DESPERATELY TRYING TO TRACK HIM DOWN , I KNOW THIS IS LIKE FINDING A NEEDLE IN A HAYSTACK , BUT I SOOOOOO MUCH WANT TO KNOW HIM , AND MY HERITAGE , if IT MIGHT BE YOU CONTACT ME ON feedowns@gmail.com. Or. Mobile
    0431446702 level a message THANKYOU , I know so many of the crew would of had shipboard romances with lovely ladies BUT I GOTTA TRY , it’s BEEN EATING ME UP INSIDE MY WHOLE ENTIRE LIFE , YOU WOULNDT IF KNOW I EXIST , BUT I GOTTA TRY XXXXX. KINDEST REGARDS ALWAYS FEE XXX ??????????????????

  3. Lisa Pola

    I travelled to UK from Melbourne, Australia on 12 August 1977. Next stop Sydney then Auckland where we discovered that the King Elvis Presley was dead.

    I remember spending good times with friends in Panama city and exploring Miami and Rotterdam. Would be great to hear from others who were travelling across on a youth fare. We were two strangers and two friends sharing a cabin on the bottom of the ship next to the bakery.

    Happy Times

    Lisa

  4. Wendy

    I came to Australia in 1973 and would like pics of anyone travelling when I did on the Australia…….

  5. Roy Ebrey

    Hi Wendy
    I also came to Australia with my parents and 2 siblings on the Australis in 1973. We left from Southampton, UK on 6th February 1973 and disembarked at Melbourne but I can’t remember the exact date. I think the voyage took around 5 weeks.

  6. Diane

    We emigrated to Australua in 1972. Left Southampton on April 10 and arrived in Melbourne mid May. Our first day out was really rough and nearly everyone was seasick except for us kids. We explored the boat from top to bottom. I was the eldest of 4 kids and our family of 6 was crammed into a tiny cabin below the water line with a leaky porthole. I don’t have happy romantic memories of this time.

  7. Elaine

    I went to melbourne in 1972 on board australis and returned in 74 or 75 cant rem ex date both ways on australis. They had fantastic shows on board. I remember coming back to southhampton and we were caught in the end of a hurricane. 4 days of rocking and rolling in the Atlantic. We met a couple called olga and dave and their son Karl and daugther julie. Often wonder what happened to them. It was an experience of a lifetime.

  8. Maggie MacGregor

    I sailed on the maiden voyage of the Australis from Southampton, UK, to Wellington, NZ. We hit a cyclone as we left Perth. As I was only 7 years old, I remember the fun! The Captain said it was the roughest crossing of the Bight he’d ever been through!

  9. Ita Tippett

    My Father Mother and seven kids come out to Australia on the SS Australis in 1970 from Ireland Left Southampton on the 19th September and arrived on the 17th of October, we had a great time. The crew were so friendly and the food amazing. We only had one or two rough nights, but the rest was great.My FATHER and I used to dance for hours in the ballroom, he loved dancing.My poor mum spent most of the time in her cabin, but she did come up occassionally on deck, she was missing her sons and daughter, and their families left behind in Ireland. We met a nice big Irish guy i think his name was Derek and he would sing Danny Boy for her and he really made her happy. ..

  10. Sally

    My parents were both in the travel industry in 1972, and were invited to a dinner dance and to stay overnight on the SS Australis when it was in Southampton docks. The ouzo must have been very plentiful as nine months later I was born- probably amongst a select crew of people who were conceived aboard the ship!

  11. Andre

    I sailed on the Auraliss 1974 out of Fremantle Perth Western Australia I was young It was bes time of my life Melbourne Sydney Auckland Suva Fiji Panama canal Acapulco Miami I’ve always wanted to meet up with some one on that voyage may be Freinds I met

  12. Olwyn Trimble

    I worked on the Australis leaving Southampton in May 1977 and bringing aome of the £10 poms to Australia. It was definitely a party boat in those days there was a party somewhere every hour of every day. Most people called me Olly in those dsys and I boarded with Sue Cannons. We still keep in touch as I now live in Perth and Sue is from Adelaide and we would like to hear from anyone who was on the ship with us.

  13. Jo

    We on same voyage as Ita Tippett, a family with four daughters from Holland immigrating to New Zealand. I wish I could remember this family but so long ago. We spoke no English or Greek, communicating was hard. But oh, the adventure.I remember funny details, crossing the equator, going to “school”, some rough nights, the swimming pool, putting on our own little shows much to the amusement of the Greek crew. I celebrated my 10th birthday onboard, I got a cake st dinner time and a waiter wanted to kiss me, I was mortified!

  14. Erik Teune

    I came to Perth on the Australis in March, 1970. The ship must have left Rotterdam in late February. I remember there was a 5 day delay. The ship stopped in Southampton and Cape Town (which I visited again last year). But what was the other place? Was it the Canary Islands. If you know can you please confirm this in a post or in an email to erik.teune@bigpond.com. Much appreciated

  15. Neville Fenn

    For those who have commented recently. There is a Facebook Group called “SS Australis Photos n Stories & Chandris Lines” with many members who have travelled on the various Chandris ships either south or north that you can join and maybe catch up with fellow passengers.

  16. TIM ROCHE

    My first adventure on SS Australis was July 1975 Sydney to Southampton via Panama canal . I was taking my girlfriend to see the sights of Britain which we did by buying a Bedford camper in London for 600 pounds and went off exploring. Stonehenge was dramatic and King Arthurs castle at Tintagel memorable. On the ship we had 2×2 berth cabins on upper deck aft ( 306 and 308 ) that looked out onto the deck, very impressive !! On my second voyage on Australis I had cabin 1139 on C Deck for a 19 day South Pacific cruise in Jan 1977 and amazingly the friendly crew remembered me from 1975 so I was over the moon !! Another great adventure it was and I will never forget the ship ever !!

  17. Neville Fenn

    For those that wish to communicate with others that may have been on your voyage, there is a FB Group “SS Australis Photos n Stories & Chandris Lines”.

  18. Paul

    The Australis was a magical ship. She was comfortable, safe and beautiful. There isn’t a day goes by that I don’t think of her. Southampton to Melbourne in 1967. I was aged 8.

  19. Scott Hanley

    Mum, Dad, my elder brothers and myself, travelled from Melbourne to Southampton in August 1977.

    I was 8 years old and it was a big adventure to me. I learned to swim in the small/kid’s pool, learned to play chess in the kid’s club, saw whales and lots of flying fish, being pulled through the Panama Canal, discovering spaghetti, getting chronic sea sickness, oh and having Wednesday twice in a row when we crossed the equator in the middle of the North Atlantic Ocean. I also remember one evening in the dining room while waiting for our meal, when the they turned all the lights out and then the next minute, all the waiters came in holding flaming cakes above their heads! I also remember playing cars with a friend I’d made on the ship when suddenly all the sirens started sounding. Everyone made their way up to the decks and I was scared and looking for my Mum and Dad, whom I eventually found. A member of staff had found me a life jacket too.

    My parents are long gone and never learned of the ship’s fate before passing. I can’t quite understand why, but I felt a tremendous sadness when I found out where the Australis ended her days. The last picture I saw online from 2018 shows only a small chunk of metal left visible.

    Wonderful memories that have helped me also remember my parents in those exciting adventurous times.

  20. Julie Tideman

    I was on the Northbound trip from Auckland to Southampton in 1977. I still have all my souvenirs from the trip, menus, plans of the boat, the certificate for ‘crossing the line’, cocktail party stuff, bar menu etc etc. Definitely a party ship. Although i was on a Youth fare I managed to get a four berth cabin on A deck. Interestingly all the girls were travelling by themselves but nearly all the boys were in groups! Stop overs were in Tahiti, Panama (into Panama City), Puerto Rico, Curacao and Vigo in Spain.

  21. Dagmar Baumgarth

    Mein verstorbener Ehemann, Heinz, lebte in Melbourne bis 1970
    Er hat auf diesem tollen Schiff gearbeitet, wenn sie eine Reparatur im Dock hatte. Im Toner, November 1970 wollte er mit ihr nach Deutschland fahren
    Leider kam es zu dem Feuer vor Fidji
    Die Australis könnte zwar aus eigener Kraft bis nach Suwa, aber er und seine damalige Familie sind dann nach Deutschland geflogen

  22. Maurice Castagnet

    Today marks 50 years that the Australis delivered me safely at Circular Quay in 1968 from Mauritius after 14 days at sea. I was 13 years old.
    Yes it was a magical journey, an adventure never to be forgotten.

  23. Janine Buckman

    I am over the moon to find this site. I sailed from Sydney to South Hampton late 1973. My round the world adventure and it couldn’t have started better than the trip on the Australis.
    I remember the Boo and Hiss shows on the open deck. Does anyone else remember them.
    She was old but delightful and fun. And the late night dancing with the crew on their deck at the back of the ship.

  24. Jennifer

    My family and I left Sydney 3rd Jan 1973 bound for Southhampton (and a year of travelling around Europe). Majority of crew on the ship were Greek and on return to England, were to report for National Service (for Greece). The ship was running behind schedule so our anticipated stop at Acapulco was abandoned and apparently this port of call was where the crew were all going to ‘jump’ ship!! The crews plans were shattered so they ‘jumped ship’ at next port, Florida, Miami. Most were caught and sent to the brig of the ship. Consequently, the rest of our trip was a nightmare as there was minimal staff! The journey was supposed to be 4 weeks but ended up being 5 weeks. At one stage, when we didn’t stop at Acapulco, we were 21 days straight at sea. We cashed in our return tickets for the ship back to Australia and flew home 12 months later!

  25. Clare Lyon

    We came on the Australis in 1967. I was 14. It was awful. They had just changed the flag to Greek, press – ganged new crew, who had never been on board before and did not know how to act appropriately. The old crew had thrown a lot of stuff overboard when they got the sack. For the whole trip never saw an eggcup and spoons were in short supply. The engine room crew was still Italian and very upset with the Greek crew, they regularly turned the hot water off.
    When we stopped in Greece they took to many people aboard. Many slept in the foyers on mattresses, making it difficult to get around at night. I do not know what would have happened if we had to abandon ship!
    More of the crew got seasick than the passengers, being new to the sea. We made some good friends and got safely to Melbourne. it is not a trip I ever wish to repeat,

  26. Liam Baird

    I sailed on Australis out of Southampton in May 1973 to Freemantle had a great time.

    I would love to get passenger list for that trip

  27. Liam Baird

    I LEFT SOUTHAMPTON ON 12 OF APRIL 1973 ON AUSTRALIS BOUND FOR FREEMANTLE.

    I WOULD LOVE TO GET PASSENGER LIST FOR THAT TRIP. I SETTLED IN QUEENSLAND

    BUT STILL HAVE GOOD MEMORIES OF THE SHIP.

  28. Adriaan Marinus Daane

    We sailed from Auckland, New Zealand, to Rotterdam, Netherlands late 1973.
    Me, Jacqueline and 4 children had a wonderful trip to Fuji than Acapulco through the Panama Canal, Fort Lauderdale to our final destination, seeing the old landing place where I used to live in Rotterdam, “The Holland America Line”.

  29. JUDY

    I sailed on the Australis in 1966 from Sydney to Naples with my husband at the time. We gave Ballroom & Latin American demonstrations and dancing lessons on the trip. From Sydney we went to NZ then back to Melbourne, across The Great Australian Bight which was an extremely rough trip, ropes were put up in the walk ways and there was no cutlery put on the tables in the dining room, nearly all the people who got on board in Melbourne were sea sick, the passengers who got on in Sydney or NZ had their sea legs by then and they survived the crossing a lot better, we were ok, everyone was happy when we got to WA. I am trying to remember all the Ports we stopped at if anyone can help that would be great, we did go up the Suez Canal to Egypt which was terrific as it was closed in 1967. We disembarked in Naples as we were going to Germany to dance in the Worlds Professional Ballroom & Latin American Dancing Championships held in Berlin, after that we flew to England where we stayed till October and then flew to Thailand and taught dancing for 2 weeks and judged their Championships then flew home to Sydney. Email any information you can tell me about Ports of Call or people who were on that trip. I think it was April/May 1966

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